Tag Archives: Found Poetry

The Found Poetry Collaboration #4, featuring: Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Gidding, Joanna Lee

24 Apr

Words

The Found Poetry Collaboration 2014

For the last 4 weeks poets Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Giddings and Joanna Lee have been writing 1 piece of found poetry per fortnight:

A found poem is created when words in an existing piece of writing are lifted from that writing and rearranged to create a greater emotional response. A found poem is shaped from a collection of words or phrases found in one text or a selection of texts to shape an entirely new poem.  

The poets were free to use any texts they like, and I  have thrown in one found text of my choice per fortnight just to mix it up a bit. For the Week 4 poem I chose a section from a  novel by Iain Banks called ‘The Bridge’ (you’ll find the section at the bottom of the post, should you wish to read it). 

 

the physiology of bursting

by Joanna Lee

 

a threshold is not a point
down-river,
a huge handless clockface
formed by stone-remembered
rooms full of whispering
glass. test the walls,
no matter how close.
the thick, white-
tiled passages
converge like
fast current: rapt &
rusted. lightwells hold
to the saddle,
to the boundary defining
a patient shadow
cleaning a window full
of the damp footfall’ed equilibria
who refuse to leave.
if the precise initial condition
is a cradle’s pulse,
small perturbations
will certainly push
the limit cross grimed flags
to one side or the other.
find the keyholes.
dust the hinges.
walk spiking and
of great length. glow.

 

found from
a section of The Bridge by Iain Banks

and

Dynamical Systems in Neuroscience: The Geometry of Excitability and Bursting by Eugene M. Izhikevich. Section 4.3.2: “Stable/Unstable Manifolds”

.

To leave the cradle

by Kate Garrett

.

I ran away and joined a group of gypsies
pawned silver beneath apple hung branches
safe from respectable society, and wrapped
forged letters in half a Romany scarf. I had
a lover of uncertain temper, no greater rogue –

he rubbed gunpowder into his wounds,
twisted, like a shipwrecked smallpox victim.
His sins caused this plague. Our rickety
dwelling sold, his throat cut. I was taken
by wandering monks from the tangled woodland.

I cheated the hangman’s noose
not once but three times –
between stone-remembered messages
my ghost haunts many places: open moor,
wild heathland, ancient passages,
a patch of light in a house called maudlin.

.

Source texts:
The Bridge by Iain Banks
Strange Stories from Devon by Rosemary Ann Lauder & Michael Williams
Cornwall: Land of Legend by Joy Wilson

.

 The earth

by Lydia Allison

.

Beneath the ancient age-grimed flags,
between the niches
its sheer physical variety is dry and open.

Stone-officials, whispering clerks,
pass under a complex jigsaw.
Dim white-tiled lightwells,
rickety cross-corridors,
keyholes whose floors are deep in dust.

Test the doors, the hinges.
Living and non-living matter.
Living things are thinly scattered,
they fill the space.
A corridor. A large round patch of light
glows ahead, broadens out.
The air, I’d swear, forming
complex webs of life.

A length of wall which ought to hold
lush forests, mountains, rainfall.
The patch of floor has a rainshadow
I don’t recall.

I reach the great round river
polishing the glass with a rag.

.

Texts:

Animal ed. David Burnie (2001) p.36

The Bridge by Iain Banks (1990) p.131

 

In The Café Of The Airport Next To My Psychiatrist’s

by James Giddings

.

My wife is having an affair; it doesn’t feel like I thought
it would: rooms full of whispering, our telepathy
losing signal behind tall pot-plants, our shouting at each other
with the volume stuck on full. The carpet squelches
with each footfall. ‘Life is what you make it,’ the scratchy
tannoy says.  ‘Life’s a beautiful thing and there’s so much
to smile about.’ Mr. Johnson stirs confetti into his coffee,
swallows a stale sandwich. Dr Joyce’s patient cleans
a patch of light on the window, polishes the shadow
from the glass at its centre with a rag. The air smells damp.
I drink so much my mouth tastes of pencils. ‘Over here Don
broke up with Emily for the second time; they were eating
omelettes with dry bread, sucking on cigarettes.’ Pretty much
all of them are going to break your heart: the atheist
in his chinos and well-fitted salmon shirt, the novelist
with her red-brick pencil skirt, her lap you want to nervously
rest your head on; how, in the light rain, they both love
and fail at everything. Just remember, some come, some go.
When her plane takes off my head swells; the weightless
moment usually makes her think about snow-globes,
white sugar landing softly, as if on the moon; she thinks
about sex, my hands being dropped ticket stubs fumbling
for loose change in a train station. She thinks about pancakes,
dreams rooftops on the seabed. She is submerging herself
in the pool of the pilots voice, how a toad might in cold water.
I deserve so much less than you. Don’t give up, Sweetie.

Extracts from:

The Bridge – Iain Banks
The Flat Battery of Flattery – Luke Kennard
The sunken Diner – Luke Kennard
Quote – Marilyn Monroe
.

 To find out more about Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna please visit:

.

Lydia Allison:

http://lydiaallison.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/LydiaAllison13

Kate Garrett:

http://www.kategarrettwrites.co.uk/

https://twitter.com/kate_garrett

James Giddings:

https://jamesgiddings.jux.com/

https://twitter.com/giddingstweets

Joanna Lee:

http://the-tenth-muse.com/

https://twitter.com/la_poetessa

.

Sadly the found poetry collaboration with Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna has concluded  but without a doubt you will be seeing them again in future collaborations on ArtiPeeps. It’s been a pleasure to work with all 4 of the foundlings. 

Tomorrow, you’ll find our Weekend Showcase featuring singer Beth Allen.  As always, thank you for your interest.

If you missed out on the previous found poems you can find them here.

.

*Full text of the piece I sent the foundlings:

I walk beneath the ancient, age-grimed flags, between the niches occupied by stone-remembered officials, past rooms full of whispering, smartly uniformed clerks. I cross dim, white-tiled lightwells on rickety cross-corridors, peer through keyholes into locked, dark, deserted passages whose floors are inches deep in dust and debris. I test the doors, but the hinges have rusted.
Finally, I come to a familiar corridor. A large round patch of light glows on the carpet ahead, where the corridor broadens out. The air smells damp; I’d swear the thick, dark carpet squelches with each footfall. I can see tall pot-plants now, and a length of wall which ought to hold the entrance to the L-shaped lift. The patch of light on the floor has a shadow in the centre of it which I don’t recall. The shadow moves.
.
I reach the light. The great round window is there, still staring down-river like a huge handless clock-face. The shadow is cast by Mr Johnson. Dr Joyce’s patient who refuses to leave the cradle. He is cleaning a window, polishing the glass at its centre with a rag, an expression of rapt concentration on his face. (131, published by Abacus, 1990)

 

BE THERE AT THE START AND HELP US MAKE THE VIRTUAL REAL

Transformations

29 Creatives, 1 Contemporary version of Ovid’s Metamorphoses

Here’s the shortcode to our Kickstarter Campaign:

http://kck.st/1i2e721

and the shortcode to the campaign video:

http://goo.gl/khucJx

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Making the Virtual Real: ArtiPeeps Update

17 Apr

 

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 I’m absolutely thrilled to announce that our Kickstarter Campaign for Transformations has been approved, which will mean we can launch our Kickstarter project this coming Monday the 21st. It’s been a real journey creating the campaign, and we’ve pulled together some really fantastic rewards, all generated from within the project- ranging from self portraits to poems written especially for you from three words that you choose.

I will post out full details including the live link when we launch on Monday.

A  successful campaign will mean that the Ovid inspired collaboration that we’ve been running virtually here for the last 15 months can be made real, showcasing 31 Twitter creatives in total and launching a large-scale exhibition template that ArtiPeps can use year-on-year to provide further opportunities.  You can find more details about Transformations in the menu above (extra to the highlighted link).  Do watch out for us on Monday. It would be fabulous to have your support!

More good news in relation to the ‘Supporting Mental Health’ side of what we do (Creatives Making A Difference). We have been approached by the UK Recovery Federation who want to use a project we put together last year in a National conference on Recovery in September. Again, I couldn’t be more happy about this as it will further showcase the creatives involved (John Mansell, Jeremy Moseley, Raymond Bentley, Carol Robson, Hugo Smith and Rebecca Audra Smith) and also make our virtual intention to explore mental health issues and well-being real. Some of us will hopefully be attending the conference and we will be presenting our video piece to the attendees.

Here is The Recovery Project:

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You can explore this season’s ‘Supporting Mental Health’ Collaborations below. They’ve been inspiring:

Loneliness (ft: Stephanie Brennan and Deborah Sheehy, Charlie Winters and Jeremy Moseley and John Mansell and Ieuan Edwards)

Anxiety and Release (ft. Mat JimDog and Mina Polen, Rod Kok and Heather Burns and *Lucy Quin and Jack Morris, and *Lauren Coulsen and Cliona Sheehan)

* Still to come.

Our season of work has been going brilliantly. There’s been a real range of collaborations, showcasing and residencies, as well as FreeSpaces where creatives like Mandy Gibson, have been revisiting past pieces and finishing them off just for this project, which is a real honour. The Found poetry collaboration has been a real find for me. I’ve enjoyed seeing what has been produced, so much so we actually did some of our own in the real-life ArtiPeeps group I run. The texts have  such an atmosphere attached to them. They’re curious. We’ve also had our first wood sculptor on ArtiPeeps’ Weekend Showcase, Mark Crowley which I’ve loved too.

Oh yes, and #ArtiPeepsChat has been going well on Twitter where I chat with creatives about their work. (8-pm-9pm every Wednesday, barring the last week in the month when it’s on a Thursday)

All in all there’s lots afoot for ArtiPeeps at the moment. This season of work continues until the end of May, and please do support us in anyway you can. Watch out for the Transformations Kickstarter launch on Monday.

 All good wishes, and thanks so much for your interest.

Nicky

 

If you would like to get involved in any of our opportunities please do get in touch either via the contact form on the What’s On page or via @ArtiPeeps

 

 

 

 

 

The Found Poetry Collaboration #3, featuring: Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Gidding, Joanna Lee

8 Apr

Words

The Found Poetry Collaboration 2014

For the next 4 weeks poets Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Giddings and Joanna Lee will be writing 1 piece of found poetry per fortnight:

A found poem is created when words in an existing piece of writing are lifted from that writing and rearranged to create a greater emotional response. A found poem is shaped from a collection of words or phrases found in one text or a selection of texts to shape an entirely new poem.  

The poets are free to use any texts they like, and I throw in one found text of my choice per fortnight just to mix it up a bit. For the Week 3 poem I chose a section from a  short story by Hermann Hesse called ‘Strange News From Another Star’ (you’ll find the section at the bottom of the post, should you wish to read it). 

.

Living Without The Bright Gods

by James Giddings

.

He just couldn’t deal with love, didn’t know how
to love us, too fucked up, wearing pink shoes and asking

for money, mystery. It seemed to him altogether too painful
to answer, and all the same laughable and silly; our prayers

in all their boring pageantry, our shining fashion of errands,
receipts and dirty dishes. I want a life that pops and sizzles:

I want to eat ripe tomatoes, sing out loud in the car with the windows open, paint my walls the exact same colour of the sky right now.

I’ve begun worshipping the sun. I formerly offered it a weeping
madonna, the face of Christ in a ciabatta roll, the cold tangerines

from the fridge. Greeting cards tell us that everybody deserves
love. No. Not all the time. Everybody deserves clean water.

.

Created using extracts from:

– Hermann Hesse, Strange News From Another Star
― Shauna Niequist, Cold Tangerines: Celebrating the Extraordinary Nature of Everyday Life
– Zadie Smith, White Teeth
– George Carlin, Brain Droppings

.

knight of cups

by Kate Garrett

.

this knight
is a troubadour
brings madness
of emotion
with the grace
of a fish.

this star
is an experience:
self-contained
dread of error
questioning the path
of the heart.

this sorrow
is laughable
your waking life
a lower order –
warmhearted mischance
of physical love.

.
source texts: 

Hermann Hesse, ‘Strange News from Another Star’ (37-38)
Trish MacGregor & Phyllis Vega, Power Tarot (‘Knight of Cups’ 102-103)

.

pi e zo elec tric i ty

noun:  electricity due to pressure, especially in a crystalline substance

by Joanna Lee

.

–they slew one another in masses

 

In astonishment at death, youth
muscles its pathway out
from deep and terrible sorrow.
Its spinal cord cleft by

passively composed spikes,
it is desensitized to
the way of life on this cruel star,
to equilibrium clamped

by the dread of bright gods,
to the vivid currents of disturbing
and volatile things
that saturate the retina. And yet

the laughable output of a single
neuron is enough to affect
the whole body, to ask bitterly
in the dark the crucial why.
Under physiological confessions,
madness is shining still,
a compelling anesthetic
to the real, evolved, pain of failure.

.

text from “Strange News From Another Star” by Hermann Hesse and Molecular and Cellular Physiology of Neurons by Gordon L. Fain, chapter 10, “Inhibitory Transmission.”

.

the youth

by Lydia Allison

.

the young man listened, astounded
at the madness and difficulty
the sadness and gravity
in the people.

he had a sense that he knew
he would never grasp
the complex context
of these terrifying, terrible, obscure,
dark things.
he felt no desire,
no wish to understand.

these sorrowful, pitiable people were creatures,
creatures of a lower order,
they had not been blessed by bright
gods. the light of the gods .
they were ruled by demons, some mischance,
mishap, some horrid error.
the course of life seemed too painful.

He was sorry for these, who lived
in dread of death
lived in gloom and killed and slew each other.
ignoble faces, crude
expressions of deep, terrible sorrow
caused him pain.
their disturbing shining fashion
almost ridiculous, almost laughable –
ridiculous and disturbing, laughable and silly
shameful and foolish.

.

* I have used the provided text, along with a different translation of the same story, “Strange news from another planet” from The Fairytales of Hermann Hesse, translated by Jack Zipes (1995: Bantam Books)

 —

 To find out more about Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna please visit:

.

Lydia Allison:

http://lydiaallison.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/LydiaAllison13

Kate Garrett:

http://www.kategarrettwrites.co.uk/

https://twitter.com/kate_garrett

James Giddings:

https://jamesgiddings.jux.com/

https://twitter.com/giddingstweets

Joanna Lee:

http://the-tenth-muse.com/

https://twitter.com/la_poetessa

.

Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna will be back on  Thursday 24th April with their last pieces of found poetry. Tomorrow, you’ll find Ben Cooper our creative resident with another piece of his work.  Thank you for your interest. 

If you missed out on the previous found poems you can find them here.

.

*Full text of the piece I sent the foundlings:

The youth listened to all this in astonishment at the madness and difficulty of the people’s way of life on this star. He would have liked to ask many more questions, but he knew with certainty that he would never understand the whole context of these dark and terrifying things; indeed, he felt no real wish to understand them.  Either these pitiable creatures belonged to a lower order, were still without the bright gods and were ruled by demons, or some unique mischance, some horrid error, prevailed on this star. And it seemed to him altogether too painful and cruel to go on questioning this king, compelling him to answers and confessions which could only be bitterly humiliating. These people who lived in the dark dread of death and yet slew one another in masses, whose faces were composed with such ignoble coarseness as that of the farmer or with such deep and terrible sorrow as that of the King, they caused him pain, and yet in their disturbing and shining fashion they seemed to him so strange as to be almost laughable, laughable and silly. (Strange News From Another Star and Other Stories, Penguin Twentieth Century Classics, 37-38).

The Found Poetry Collaboration #2, featuring: Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Gidding, Joanna Lee

24 Mar

Words

The Found Poetry Collaboration 2014

For the next 4 weeks poets Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Giddings and Joanna Lee will be writing 1 piece of found poetry per fortnight:

A found poem is created when words in an existing piece of writing are lifted from that writing and rearranged to create a greater emotional response. A found poem is shaped from a collection of words or phrases found in one text or a selection of texts to shape an entirely new poem.  

The poets are free to use any texts they like, and I throw in one found text of my choice per fortnight just to mix it up a bit. For the Week 2 poem I chose a section of a  letter from a former patient of Jung quoted in Anthony Storr’s Solitude (you’ll find the section at the bottom of the post, should you wish to read it). 

.

on the pathology of nihilism

by Joanna Lee

.

with clammy skin the heart cascades
much as a mass of cold knowledge
falls from the gut: septic, humoral,

jugular; a clot of air in the lungs blue-
highlighted with the less
clinically obvious algorithms

of life. i titrate swelling
mortality with strokes of fever,
and ought accept the loss i was,

a distal necessary pulse
with a dropped
mask and muscled jaw.

forever is a bedside curve
of sun and shadow, not
as i wanted it to be but

dissolved to a heavier,
taller, younger equilibration.
only fools demand nothing.

i could never have imagined
our thrust was the resuscitation
of ordinary activities such

as breathing, to force
reality like a balloon
into the femoral vein,

precisely keeping
the bleeding quiet but
biochemically alive.

.

Text from

part of a letter from a patient of Carl Jung, quoted in Solitude by Anthony Storr and Fundamentals of Surgery by John E. Niederhuber, chapter 15, “Shock and Resuscitation,” by Adam Siever, MD

.

Out of evil

by Lydia Allison

.

much good has come to me
quiet, attentive, accepting

reality – they are, and not to be
such as could before.
When we accepted things they overpowered us.

I intend to play in this way accepting everything.
What I was:
force, thought.

Keeping nothing remaining,
taking things as I want them,
doing all this – unusual knowledge,

unusual powers I have imagined.
I always thought in some way or other
to be true towards the game

of life – receptive whatever –
good, bad, sun, shadow – forever,
my nature side’s alive.

Fool! How I tried
to go according to the way
I ought to.

.

*Created solely from the words from Jung’s letter.

.

I’m the girl who is lost in space

by James Giddings

.

forever fading away by keeping quiet,
by accepting reality and taking things
as they are: some party someplace, or

some picnic in the park, the Soviet Union.
Ideas and feelings are fast and frequent
as shooting stars. The fast ideas

are far too fast, and unusual knowledge
has come to me; the right words and gestures
are suddenly there like the Cheshire cat:

the warm artificial smile, clownish curve,
the kind you see on villains in Disney movies.
You find interests in uninteresting people.

I intend to play the game of life – sun and shadow
forever alternating – everything more alive.
You never knew those caves were there.

.

Texts:

Elizabeth Wurtzel, Prozac Nation
Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness
Part of a letter from a patient of Carl Jung, quoted in Solitude by Anthony Storr

.

Transmitters

by Kate Garrett

.

unusual knowledge
overpowered me
in darkness –

receptive to evil
i can’t tell
the difference.

sun/shadow
good/bad
alternating forever

in a cage
with a wire screen
hallucinate effigies

to starve your beauty.
beware the first
principle of anti-choice:

bland words, no life,
accepting torn sex
as your birthright.

 

.

Poem – title included – created solely from words found in an extract from Solitude by Anthony Storr, and the songs ‘No Love Lost’ by Joy Division & ‘PCP’ by Manic Street Preachers.

.

…….

 To find out more about Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna please visit:

.

Lydia Allison:

http://lydiaallison.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/LydiaAllison13

Kate Garrett:

http://www.kategarrettwrites.co.uk/

https://twitter.com/kate_garrett

James Giddings:

https://jamesgiddings.jux.com/

https://twitter.com/giddingstweets

Joanna Lee:

http://the-tenth-muse.com/

https://twitter.com/la_poetessa

.

Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna will be back on Tuesday 8th April  with some more great found poetry. Tomorrow, you’ll find Poet Lauren Coulson’s final poem in her nest series (with audio).  Thank you for your interest. 

If you missed out on the first round of found poems you can find them here.

.

*Full text of the piece I sent the foundlings:

Out of evil, much good has come to me. By keeping quiet, repressing nothing, remaining attentive, and by accepting reality-taking things as they are, and not as I wanted them to be- by doing all this, unusual knowledge has come to me, and unusual powers as well, such as I could never have imagined before. I always thought that when we accepted things they overpowered us in some way or other. This turns out not to be true at all, and it is only by accepting them that one can assume an attitude towards them. So now I intend to play the game of life, being receptive to whatever comes to me, good or bad, sun and shadow forever alternating, and, in this way, also accepting my own nature with its positive and negative sides. Thus everything becomes more alive to me. What a fool I was. How I tried to force everything to go according to the way I thought it ought to! (195)

The Found Poetry Collaboration #1, featuring: Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Gidding, Joanna Lee

10 Mar

Words

The Found Poetry Collaboration 2014

For the next 8 weeks poets Lydia Allison, Kate Garrett, James Giddings and Joanna Lee will be writing 1 piece of found poetry per fortnight:

A found poem is created when words in an existing piece of writing are lifted from that writing and rearranged to create a greater emotional response. A found poem is shaped from a collection of words or phrases found in one text or a selection of texts to shape an entirely new poem.  

The poets are free to use any texts they like, and I throw in one found text of my choice per fortnight just to mix it up a bit. For the Week 1 poem I chose a section of text from W.G. Sebald’s The Ring’s Of Saturn (you’ll find the section at the bottom of the post, should you wish to read it). 

.

…….rings

by Lydia Allison

.

walls hung with copper masks,
hand-coloured and perhaps untouched

………….wear it: bankers, investors,
……………………people who believe in symbolism 

………….plaster blotches moth-eaten
………….a ghost bowed by sorrows

colourless, pink, blue,
………….green, champagne,

there are moments, through rooms
sure of the shores or the heart

…………..the symbolism is clear:
there is only one

…………..the dark continent.
…………..say which decade for ages co-exist

.

note: I have used The Rings of Saturn text, along with texts from three sites about wedding ring stone meanings. Here are the links:

http://www.beau-coup.com/blog/wedding-attire/the-meaning-behind-colored-gemstone-engagement-rings

http://www.ringswithlove.com/gemstones/gemstone-names-colors-meanings-characteristics/

http://www.myloveweddingring.com/engagement-ring-guide.html

—-

On Tea & Sympathy

by Kate Garrett

.

The walls are hung
with rich violet hues.
The Queen of Tulips
fills copper kettles:
green tea, freshly
brewed by an artist,
calms your senses.

The exquisite flowers,
mottled with scarlet
& purple blotches
lift your spirits
into a realm hand-
coloured by Modernism –

a country house
for healing,
some kind of no-man’s-land,
luscious, depending
on which blossoms
the bees have buzzed.

The yellowish air
filling the dark night
brings your fantasies alive –
the Emblem of Love,
a ghost bowed by sorrows,
enveloping you, helps
the ages co-exist.

.

*Written using only words from the text provided (extract from The Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald) and various scent descriptions on twelve boxes of Tulasi incense sticks (see photo).

.

incense found poetry

The Rings

by James Giddings

.

After what feels like two thousand years
in the heart of the dark continent, I find you
under the shores of the Arctic Ocean. 
I dig
and dig until the mottled, moth-eaten fur
of your stuffed polar bear springs up in its red felt
African mask; the coloured faces of artist’s portraits
yellowish with bedpan-relief. You must have passed
through the rooms to heaven, or to a country house
in Suffolk. You ask me to stay and no one can say
which decade or century it is; I know this is the afterlife
your body, half a wedding-suit, lost in the shadows.

.

*Found poem. Created from bits of the following:
The Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald
Salmon by Pascale Petit
The Second Husband by Pascale Petit

notes on cardiac physiology

by Joanna Lee

.

hung with bedpans and hussars’ sabres the human heart
has a discriminative touch.

mottled scarlet, it routes a solitary pathway
across continents, Oceans, losses.

the profound shores of forehead, scalp tongue
are excitatory ghosts bowed by sorrows,

safari trophies that include the entire body
of its dark.

The stuffed polar bear at its entrance stands yards tall.

it receives different blood by moment, tastes
red of serotonin, is spared no-man’s-land

by the lacrimal tearing of vessels.
it is intractable. it is artist. it is acute,

an arctic gag reflex with a visceral
trajectory but no position sense.

known to be a major circuit,
its fibers course through copper battles,

and may produce pain.

.

*Found from:

 Neuroanatomy: An Atlas of Structures, Sections, and Systems, Fifth Edition, Sections 7-3 to 7-8: Sensory Pathways. by Duane E. Haines and The Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald.

.

 To find out more about Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna please visit:

.

Lydia Allison:

http://lydiaallison.wordpress.com/

https://twitter.com/LydiaAllison13

Kate Garrett:

http://www.kategarrettwrites.co.uk/

https://twitter.com/kate_garrett

James Giddings:

https://jamesgiddings.jux.com/

https://twitter.com/giddingstweets

Joanna Lee:

http://the-tenth-muse.com/

https://twitter.com/la_poetessa

.

Lydia, Kate, James and Joanna will be back on Monday 24th March with some more great found poetry. I’ve sent them their text just a moment ago. Tomorrow, you’ll find Millfield School’s first FreeSpace with a range of Short story openings from their pupils. Thank you for your interest. 

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*If you want to see the piece of text I sent the foundlings. Here it is:

The walls are hung with copper kettles, bedpans, hussars’ sabres. African masks, spears, safari trophies, hand-coloured engravings of Boer War battles- Battles of Pieters Hill and Relief of Ladysmith; A Bird’s Eye View from an Observation Balloon-and a number of family portraits painted perhaps some time between 1920 and 1960 by an artist not untouched by Modernism, the plaster coloured faces of the sitters mottled with scarlet and purple blotches. The stuffed polar bear in the entrance hall stands yards tall. With its yellowish and moth-eaten fur, it resembles a ghost bowed by sorrows. There are indeed moments, as one passes through the rooms open to the public at Somerlyton, when one is not quite sure whether one is in a country house in Suffolk or some kind of no-man’s-land, on the shores of the Arctic Ocean or in the heart of the dark continent. Nor can one readily say which decade or century it is, for many ages are superimposed here and co-exist. (35-36)

A GREAT NEW SEASON OF WORK!

3 Mar

Spring

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A WARM WELCOME TO ARTIPEEPS’ SECOND SEASON OF WORK

We’ve got a lot going on over the next three months (there are full details for the next 3 months on the What’s On Calendar, something every day). Lot’s of great showcasing, collaborations and mental health initiatives, along with the launch of our Kickstarter Campaign  to turn Transformations, the large-scale poetry art project we’ve been running for the last 15 months inspired by Ovid’s Metamorphoses, into a fantastic exhibition in Hanse House Norfolk. See here.  

We’re hoping the campaign date will start on Monday 21st April but this is dependent on whether we have heard from particular funders or not.  Here’s the campaign badge that has been designed by Gary Caldwell who was one of the artists involved in the first ever collaboration on ArtiPeeps two years ago! 

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new-badge5

Any, and every bit, of  support you can give us when this starts will be much appreciated, so you can be there at the start, and help us make this virtual project real. It’s an amazingly formative and exciting  time for ArtiPeeps.

This season we’ve got 12 new creatives featured in Weekend Showcase every  Friday. The creatives featured are a mixture of poets, prose writers, wood sculptors, singers and artists all presenting one piece that they feel best represents them.

J Matthew Waters (poet); Ieuan Edwards (Linocut artist); Shirley Golden (prose writer); Anthony Di Martino (poet), Mark Crawley (Wood Sculptor); Stephanie Brennan (poet and writer); Darren Goldsmith (writer); Beth Allen (musician/singer), Jack Morris (artist), Abbie Neely (writer), Ashley Mackenzie (artist) and Hank Archer (poet).

Some  showcasers are also taking part in our ‘ Supporting Mental Health’ collaborations, as well as those who have taken part in previous collaborations.  This season we’re focusing on:

1.  Loneliness: 3 artists: Deborah Sheehy, Jeremy Moseley, Ieuan Edwards and 3 poets: Stephanie Brennan, Charlie Winters, John Mansell over 6 weeks

 and

2. Anxiety and Release: 4 artists: Mat JimDog, Heather Burns, Jack Morris, Cliona Shehan  and 4 poets: Mina Polen, Rod Kok, Lucy Quin, Lauren Coulson . The poets are taking the theme of anxiety and the artists responding in relation to release.

Both collaborations will be attempting to engage with these important issues in an artistic, innovative and engaging way in order to raise awareness and promote discussion. You’ll see the first Loneliness collaboration roll out this Thursday. It is then my intention to turn these mid-sized collaborations into a larger exhibition. 

We also have a broad range of creatives taking up our ‘FreeSpace’ opportunity (3 free spaces over a season of work) : we have poets Mandy Gibson, Kate Garrett and writer Estrella Azul, and we are thrilled to have Millfield School in Somerset taking up a FreeSpace as well;  a selection of their pupils will be showcased. The school is also  holding a  poetry festival  in June and we are delighted to be posting out their festival material through ArtiPeeps during that month. I’m hoping that this will be the beginning of an ongoing relationship with Millfield.  I couldn’t be more happy about this.

This season we also have two creative residencies ( that span over 1 month each) and we’re delighted to have emerging performance poet Lauren Coulson  with us in March who is focusing her residency on the notion of nesting and she is working with artist Atalina Homan, who is creating artwork for two of her pieces. We also have writer Ben Cooper (who was a Hot Potato last year) in a residency with us in April. At the moment the creative residency intiative is  a work-in-progress, but I hope to really develop them into a really strong package that can support and nurture wholeheartedly.

We’ve got another Hot Potato starting featuring 6 emerging prose writers (Steve Harris, Michael Schmidt, Shannon Pardoe, Holly Gibson, Josh Kremer and Jessica Cooke) . Each writer writing one section and then passing it on to the next writer, and in so doing creating one collaborative short story. This is the second one we have run, the first being completed last year with Robo-girl. It’s a great format that can go anywhere! When we have enough of them we’re going to create a published collection. In the interim, I create an interactive pdf and an artist illustrates their work.

Finally, we’re introducing a new mid-sized poetry collaboration which we’re hoping will become a regular called Found Poetry Where 4 poets will be writing a poem made out of  found texts ( with me flinging in one found text into the mix too). So there will be new found poetry every fortnight for 8 weeks. James Giddings, who was showcased last season and Lydia Allison who had a residency last year and Joanna Lee and Kate Garrett will be the poets involved.

It’s also worth mentioning that from now on, on Wednesdays, from 8-9pm I’m going to be starting a Twitter  #ArtiPeepsChat hour to generate interest and promote this season’s showcases, collaborations etc.  I will hopefully be chatting to the creatives involved in that week and dealing with any themes that have been raised.  I’m hoping that this will then transform into campaign chat to promote what we’re doing in relation to Transformations. Do feel free to join in if you are on Twitter at that time, and join in the ArtiPeepsChat.

Thrilled to be running this season and working with more fantastic creatives, and excitedly girding my loins for our Kickstarter Campaign. 

I hope you enjoy what we do, and if you’d like to get involved in next season do get in contact with me via the contact form on the What’s On page, or via @ArtiPeeps.

Thanks so much for your interest.

All the very best.

Nicky

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