Tag Archives: inspiration

The Galloping Horse: Beyond Creative Fear and Pain

4 Feb
Galloping Horse by Neff, See: th08.deviantart.net

Galloping Horse by Neff, See: th08.deviantart.net

Jorge Luis Borges, or at least his character, in his short story Shakespeare’s Memory makes the following observation that  t’s 

‘Pain and fear that makes us creative’

and this got me thinking, got me querying as to whether this actually is the case and whether it’s actually sensible and healthy for us to think of creativity as like that? Is that a good way look at something that is so fundamentally amazing and life giving and affirming? What would be wrong in shifting this view? What would be wrong in shifting the idea of the tortured artist? 

Elizabeth Gilbert in her inspiring TED speech addresses this question in a far more articulate and sensitive way than I probably can, so   I have used her talk as a springboard from which to formulate my response. I’ve embedded the video at the bottom of this post, and I heartily recommend that you watch it all. It’s well worth it.

She draws our attention to the way the origins of creativity/ art  were perceived before the age of rational humanism. In ancient Greece and Rome creativity came to us through ‘daemons’:  divine, attendant spirits who are also known as geniuses. Entities who like coaches rest on our shoulder, or inside us and direct our creativity. Creativity was seen as something outside of us and directed through us. We are the conduit of creativity and not the creativity ourselves. Rational humanism came along (placing huge emphasis on using reason to shape our world and not religion); and there was a shift in thinking and the idea of BEING a genius instead of HAVING a genius came about. Gilbert suggests that this paradigm shift is what has consolidated this notion of the relationship between creativity and pain.

Now admittedly I’m not drawn to lighter literature. all the authors, poets and artists that I value aren’t generally ‘happy chappies’. There is something profoundly compelling and attractive and even romantic about the idea of a tortured self, squeezing words out like blood, or the complete opposite where you’re in flow and time goes by and you’re just living and breathing words and images. Both conceits are attractive.  But the value of Gilbert’s observations lies in fighting against the former and latter perceptions; in the separation of the work from the artist. Two separate entities.

She says our job , as an artist, writer, poet, is to show up. Genius comes and goes, inspiration comes and goes and it’s our role to step up for when it’s there. But to think that we are the entire source of  our creativity puts too much pressure on us. It, as she says, ‘warps and distorts our expectations’ and actually the pressure can kill; kills the creativity; kills the pleasure.

Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog 1818

Caspar David Friedrich :Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog 1818

This pressure can also disconnect us from reality, can create a vast chasm between us and the real world. Our imaginations can keep us distant from reality. Think of Caspar David Friedrich and his picture, (left) of the lone artist on the mountaintop. Remember how lonely and isolated we can feel when writing, shaping something. And this notion of isolation has been contemplated and explored by a variety of poets. Alexander Pope’s Ode To Solitude. Philip Larkin’s poem Best Society,  that I put up a couple of weeks ago. Here

And just like there’s a difference between having a genius and being a genius, there’s also a  difference between loneliness and solitude, with the two terms sometimes being conflated and blurred and their difference being dismissed. Indeed, there is nothing wrong with solitude. As psychologist Rollo May says:

‘In order to be open to creativity one must have the capacity for constructive use of solitude. One must overcome the fear of being alone.’

There’s a real  difference between the two terms.

As philosopher Paul Tillich puts forward:

‘Our language has wisely sensed the two sides of being alone. It has created the word loneliness to express the pain of being alone. And it has created the word solitude to express the story of being alone.’

Although I agree with what May and Tillich are expressing about ‘the two sides of being alone’ they still do (to my mind) embrace a rational mindset and are perpetuating a particular perception of the artist as ‘a solitary figure perpetually at the mercy of their creativity’. Their views are still feeding the myth that Gilbert was warning us against. Despite their distinction between the pain of aloneness and and solitude they are clearly very much aligned with a notion of ‘beingness’. Being the source.

The two distinctions can rest side-by-side, no problem; it then just becomes comes a matter of where we place value.  How we see it. How we shape our story. There is nothing essentially wrong with needing space and alone-time as long as we don’t pressurise ourselves within it. It’s up to us. 

Ruth Stone, 1915-2011

Ruth Stone, 1915-2011

In the Gilbert speech she describes an interview she had with a particular poet Ruth Stone who when describing her poetry to Gilbert described it as rumbling up inside of her,  vivid,  like a galloping horse. All she had to do, she told Gilbert, was to hold steady of the reigns with one hand whilst holding a pencil in the other and let the words charge through. A wonderful metaphor for the writing process (sometimes). A wonderful metaphor for those moments of creative genius. Something wonderful, mystical and totally coherent that sometimes gallops through us when we create. But it comes and goes. It often feels ethereal almost god-like, pure sparkle, in the moment.  But it ebbs and flows. Most of the time it’s about stepping up, and creating regularly. ‘It’s our job’ as Gilbert puts it. It’s just a job and when that galloping horse moment comes we have to be thankful of it, and welcome it but not make it our be all and end all. Our job  as creatives is to show up and revel in that moment when it does come. Creativity is a gift. To castigate ourselves and put ourselves down when it doesn’t come is a sheer waste of energy and a misunderstanding of the nature of creativity and our relationship to it. 

To continue to think that pain and fear are necessary to create is to proliferate an idea and a way of being that correlates our creativity with something strictured and tortured. Creativity and the lives we shape around our  specific identity as a creator doesn’t have to be self-punishing or full of ‘shoulds’. We can give ourselves places and spaces for grace- whether our art comes or goes.

When we create something a precious moment has been given to us; when we create something it usually has formed from a  deep personal space from within but always needs to be outed (somehow); when we create something in that moment of flow a particular need to express and communicate is released. It is  given to us (sometimes) and why should we feel it necessary to dismantle this perception (as we tend to) or turn ourselves into self-castigating, pressurised souls. There’s no need.

  • You can hear Borges’ short story Shakespeare’s Memory being read on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast by Hisham Mater HERE
  • Elizabeth Gilbert’s TED Speech

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Something For the Weekend #7

19 Jan

Horizons

It is the function of creative men to perceive the relations between thoughts, or things, or forms of expression that may seem utterly different and to be able to combine them into some new form’. William Plomer

Some inspirational snippets and recommendations for your weekend

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Something to Watch:  

DVD:  Let the Right One In

INTIMATE, DENSE, IMAGINATIVE

Let the Right One InA  film  directed by Tomas Alfredson  with a screenplay by John Ajvide Lindqvist (adapted from his book of the same name ) from 2008 starring  Kåre Hedebrant and Lina Leandersson. A  sensitive and lyrical  horror film (yes, they can be) about a  young boy Oskar  and his blossoming friendship with Eli which becomes a tale of life and death.

Why you could watch it:

For its subtlty,  sensitivity and lyricism.  It has a few vampiric moments but it’s actually an egrossing tale about friendship, love  and not fitting in.  Elements of our lives that we have all shared. And the young leads are great too.

Here’s the author, Lindquist, talking about his book:

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Something To Listen To: 

Gavin Bryars: Jesus’ Blood Never Left Me Yet

MESMERISING, SOULFUL, DELICATE

A piece composed from a drunken song he heard being sung by a person living rough on the streets in London. Looping the words round and round he created this:

  Official Website

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Something To Look At:

George Braque (1882-1963)  

SPLITTING, RESTORING, DEFINING George Braque

20th century French painter and sculptor, who along with Pablo Picasso developed the art style known as Cubism

Once an object has been incorporated in a picture it accepts a new destiny. 
To define a thing is to substitute the definition for the thing itself.

 
An Interesting Mini-Audio on Georges Braque’s, Mandoline à la sonate
2554_14_Braque_Mandoline-à-la-sonate

Conor Jordan, Deputy Chairman of Christie’s autioneers discusses Mandoline a la Sonate
http://www.christies.com/features/audio-georges-braque-mandoline-a-la-sonate-2266-4.aspx


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Something To Read:

Gertrude Stein

(1874-1946)

Gertrude Stein
American
Modernist experimental writer of prose and poetry;
and art collector
EXPERIMENTING, QUESTIONING, EXCHANGING
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Here’s an Audio Biography of Stein:
http://www.biography.com/people/gertrude-stein-9493261

 

And Excerpts from Tender Buttons (1914)

From ‘Objects’

A Long Dress

What is the current that makes machinery, that makes it crackle, what is the current that presents a long line and a necessary waist. What is this current.  What is the wind, what is it.  Where is the serene length, it is there and a dark place is not a dark place, only a white and red are black, only a yellow and green are blue, a pink is scarlet, a bow is every color. A line distinguishes it. A line just distinguishes it. 

 A Red Hat

   A dark grey, a very dark grey, a quite dark grey is monstrous ordinarily, it is so monstrous because there is no red in it. If red is in everything it is not necessary. Is that not an argument for any use of it and even so is there any place that is better, is there any place that has so much stretched out. 

For more see:

http://www.bartleby.com/140/
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Here’s an online version of her famous Cubist influenced novel Three Lives (1906):
http://www.bartleby.com/74/

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Something To Think About:

FLUX, PATHS, FLUIDITY

Heraclitus (c535 BCE-c475BCE)

A Greek Philosopher
Heraclitis and Democrotius by Salvatore Rosa

Heraclitis and Democrotius by Salvatore Rosa

famous for his insistence on ever-present change in the universe

Good character is not formed in a week or a month. It is created little by little, day by day. Protracted and patient effort is needed to develop good character. 

Much learning does not teach understanding.

Knowing not how to listen, they do not [know] how to speak

Read more at: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/h/heraclitus.html#5LqJL3LAH517voLr.99 

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A Reading on Heraclitus from Bertand Russell’s The History of Western Philosophy:

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Something For You:

Inspired  Feelings, whether of compassion or irritation, should be welcomed, recognized, and treated on an absolutely equal basis; because both are ourselves. The tangerine I am eating is me. The mustard greens I am planting are me. I plant with all my heart and mind. I clean this teapot with the kind of attention I would have were I giving the baby Buddha or Jesus a bath. Nothing should be treated more carefully than anything else. In mindfulness, compassion, irritation, mustard green plant, and teapot are all sacred. Thich Nhat Hanh    

Something For the Weekend #6

12 Jan

Horizons

It is the function of creative men to perceive the relations between thoughts, or things, or forms of expression that may seem utterly different and to be able to combine them into some new form’. William Plomer

Some inspirational snippets and recommendations for your weekend

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Something to Watch:  

DVD:  The Page Turner

The Page TurnerA  film  written and directed by Denis Dercourt  from 2006  starring Catherine Frot and Deborah Francois. A film about a 10 year old butcher’s daughter who holds revenge at the core of her heart until it is released as an adult as a page turner against the pianist who rejected her as a child.

Why you could watch it:

For the slowly ratcheted tension that is built up throughout the film, and the two female leads particularly Deborah Francois whose cultivated stare is pitched perfectly to get under your skin.

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CINEMA

The HobbitHere’s another great film review of The Hobbit by the tale of bengwy

http://bengwy.wordpress.com/2012/12/14/the-hobbit-an-unexpected-journey/

 

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Something To Listen To: 

1. The Cocteau Twins– Song To the Sirens

2.Song To the Moon by Anton Dvorak from Rusalka

3. Sharon Van Etten, Live ‘Give Out’

Just discovered Sharon this morning. Beautiful

http://sharonvanetten.com/

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Something To Look At:

Robert Delauney

(1885-1941)

Robert Delauney

 

 French artist

 Cofounded the Orphism art movement, noted for its use of strong colours and geometric shapes…His key influence related to bold use of colour, and a clear love of experimentation of both depth and tone.

Click link (left) under name for more…

I am very much afraid of definitions, and yet one is almost forced to make them. One must take care, too, not to be inhibited by them.
Robert Delaunay 

Read more at 

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/r/robert_delaunay.html#ZPbICX3XCDfhj6PR.99 

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Something To Read:

Hugh MacDiarmid

(1892-1978)

Hugh MacDiarmid

Scottish poet, attempted to revive the Scottish language in poetry as a means of asserting Scotland’s artistic independence from England and re-invigorating a literature suffering from sentimentality. 

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It is time we in Scotland put England in its proper place and instead of our leaning on England and taking inspiration from her, we should lean and turn to Europe, for it is there our future prosperity lies.
Hugh MacDiarmid 

Read more at:

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/h/hugh_macdiarmid.html#g30bTUm2KISLmRyX.


Completely beautiful articulation of national identity:

Scotland

by Hugh MacDiarmid

It requires great love of it deeply to read

The configuration of a land,

Gradually grow conscious of fine shadings,

Of great meanings in slight symbols,

Hear at last the great voice that speaks softly

See the swell and fall upon the flank

Of a statue carved out in a whole country’s marble,

Be like Spring, like a hand in a window

Moving new and old things carefully to and fro,

Moving a fraction of a flower here,

Placing an inch of air there,

And without breaking anything.

So I have gathered unto myself

All the loose ends of Scotland,

And by naming them and accepting them,

Loving them and identifying with them,

Attempt to express the whole.

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From Complete Poems, edited by Michael Grieve and W.R. Aitken (Carcanet Press, 2 vols., 1993-4)

Reproduced by permission of the publisher

See:

http://www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poetry/poems/scotland-0

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Hugh MacDiarmid Reading the Watergaw:

http://www.poetryarchive.org/poetryarchive/singlePoem.do?poemId=1558

 

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Hugh MacDiarmid: A Portrait by Margaret Tait (1964)

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 Something To Think About:

Arthur Schopenhauer

(1788-1860)

German Philosopher


Arthur Schopenhauer

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Without books the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are the engines of change, windows on the world, “Lighthouses” as the poet said “erected in the sea of time.” They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind, Books are humanity in print.” 

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“Hope is the confusion of the desire for a thing with its probability. ” 

For quotes see:

http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/11682.Arthur_Schopenhauer

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Schopenhauer, BBC, Sea of Faith with Don Cupitt

http://www.doncupitt.com/don-cupitt

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Something For You:

Inspired

 

‘If you limit your choices only to what seems possible or reasonable, you disconnect yourself from what you truly want, and all that is left is compromise. Robert Fritz

 

Something For the Weekend #5

5 Jan

Horizons

It is the function of creative men to perceive the relations between thoughts, or things, or forms of expression that may seem utterly different and to be able to combine them into some new form’. William Plomer

Some inspirational snippets and recommendations for your weekend

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Something to Watch:  

DVD:  PERSONA

PersonaA  film  written and directed by Ingmar Bergman from 1966  starring Liv Ullman and Bibi Andersson. One of Bergman’s most influential films charting the startling merging of two women’s personalities and identities

Why you could watch it:

For the sheer innovation of the cinematography and camera angles, and for the intensity of the female leads and the morphing face frame which is incredibly powerful

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 Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.
Ingmar Bergman 


Read more at:

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/i/ingmar_bergman.html#K8VAzzsscTTU023B.99 

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Here’s  the first part of an interview with Bergman . 

Here are the other 5 links to the other parts of the interview: 

Part 2: http://youtu.be/51WUgKcIXBw

Part 3: http://youtu.be/YRS6Uu9-OPk

Part 4: http://youtu.be/ROQZLJZ6aSs

Part 5: http://youtu.be/xt6UwqHPp54

Part 6: http://youtu.be/90CCPSAF4Zw

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CINEMA

Life of Pi

Here’s another great film review of Life Of Pi by the tale of bengwy: 

http://bengwy.wordpress.com/2012/12/23/life-of-pi-gonna-need-a-bigger-boat/

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Something To Listen To: 

JOYCE GRENFELL

(1910-1979)

Joyce Grenfell  an English actress, comedienne, monologist and singer-songwriter

Happiness is the sublime moment when you get out of your corsets at night. 
Joyce Grenfell 

*

Read more at:

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/joyce_grenfell.html#4jClv7ijypO1ZoWX.99

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One of Grenfell’s comic monologues animated….

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Something To Look At:

M.C Escher

(1898 – 1972)

M.C. Escher

‘known for his often mathematically inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints. These feature impossible constructions,explorations of infinity, architecture, and tessellations’. See link, left.

Official Website: http://www.mcescher.com/

‘He who wonders discovers that this in itself is wonder.’

Read more at:

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/m_c_escher.html#ijyRMKx9KTmI3CWQ.99 

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We adore chaos because we love to produce order. 

Read more at:

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/m_c_escher.html#ijyRMKx9KTmI3CWQ.99 
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My work is a game, a very serious game. 


Read more at: 

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/m/m_c_escher.html#ijyRMKx9KTmI3CWQ.99 

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Escher Inspired Animation:

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Something To Read:

Margaret Attwood

http://www.margaretatwood.ca/

Margaret Atwood

‘Love blurs your vision; but after it recedes, you can see more clearly than ever. It’s like the tide going out, revealing whatever’s been thrown away and sunk: broken bottles, old gloves, rusting pop cans, nibbled fishbodies, bones. This is the kind of thing you see if you sit in the darkness with open eyes, not knowing the future.”  ― Margaret AtwoodCat’s Eye

Cat’s Eyes is one of my favourite books of Atwoods; it  made a real impression on me when I was younger, it helped….. 

http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/3472.Margaret_Atwood

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In the Secular Night

by Margaret Atwood

In the secular night you wander around
alone in your house. It’s two-thirty.
Everyone has deserted you,
or this is your story;
you remember it from being sixteen,
when the others were out somewhere, having a good time,
or so you suspected,
and you had to baby-sit.
You took a large scoop of vanilla ice-cream
and filled up the glass with grapejuice
and ginger ale, and put on Glenn Miller
with his big-band sound,
and lit a cigarette and blew the smoke up the chimney,
and cried for a while because you were not dancing,
and then danced, by yourself, your mouth circled with purple.


Now, forty years later, things have changed,
and it’s baby lima beans.
It’s necessary to reserve a secret vice.
This is what comes from forgetting to eat
at the stated mealtimes. You simmer them carefully,
drain, add cream and pepper,
and amble up and down the stairs,
scooping them up with your fingers right out of the bowl,
talking to yourself out loud.
You’d be surprised if you got an answer,
but that part will come later.


There is so much silence between the words,
you say. You say, The sensed absence
of God and the sensed presence
amount to much the same thing,
only in reverse.
You say, I have too much white clothing.
You start to hum.
Several hundred years ago
this could have been mysticism
or heresy. It isn’t now.
Outside there are sirens.
Someone’s been run over.
The century grinds on.

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/in-the-secular-night/

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 Something To Think About:

Tillie Olsen

(1912-2007)

American writer and feminist 

Tillie Olsen

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From Silences (1962) ….Literary history and the present are dark with silences: some the silences for years by our acknowledged great; some silences hidden; some the ceasing to publish after one work appears; some the never coming to book form at all. What is it that happens with the creator, to the creative process, in that time? What are creation’s needs for full functioning? Without intention of or pretension to literary scholarship, I have had special need to learn all I could of this over the years, myself so nearly remaining mute and having to let writing die over and over again in me. These are not natural silences….

For more go to:

 http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/m_r/olsen/silences.htm

Time granted does not necessarily coincide with time that can be most fully used. 

Tillie Olsen


Read more at:

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/t/tillie_olsen.html#XIZOYRGU8mItrKtT.99

I know that I haven’t powers enough to divide myself into one who earns and one who creates.
Tillie Olsen 


Read more at:

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/t/tillie_olsen.html#62K8b2okBR34aBvK.99

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Something For You:

Inspired

…Everything can be taken from a man but one thing; the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way. Viktor Frankl, from Man’s Search For Meaning

 

Something For the Weekend #4

29 Dec

Horizons

It is the function of creative men to perceive the relations between thoughts, or things, or forms of expression that may seem utterly different and to be able to combine them into some new form’. William Plomer

Some inspirational snippets and recommendations for your weekend

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Something to Watch:  

DVD:  PLEASANTVILLE

PleasantvilleA  film  written and directed by Gary Ross from 1998  starring Tobey Maguire, Jeff Daniels and Joan Allen,  multi-layered, aesthetically and emotionally ,  set in Pleasantville where there has never been any rain, aggression,  change, acceptance, passion or love. Until Now…..

Why you could watch it:

it grapples with our relationship to history and time; it addresses issues in relation to   feminism, race, art and writing.  It uses colour in an amazingly innovative delicate way too. And there’s Joan Allen and  William H Macy and the  makeup scene.   

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Here’s  a taster clip. 

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Something To Listen To: 

Kate Rusby

Kate Rusby

English Folk Singer From North Yorkshire

Simply beautiful, the song

….Underneath the Stars…..from Kate’s album Underneath the Stars 

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Underneath the stars I’ll meet you
Underneath the stars I’ll greet you
There beneath the stars I’ll leave you
Before you go of your own free will

Go gently

Underneath the stars you met me
Underneath the stars you left me
I wonder if the stars regret me
At least you’ll go of your own free will

Go gently

Here beneath the stars I’m landing
And here beneath the stars not ending
Why on earth am I pretending?
I’m here again, the stars befriending
They come and go of their own free will

Go gently
Go gently

Underneath the stars you met me
And Underneath the stars you left me
I wonder if the stars regret me
I’m sure they’d like me if they only met me
They come and go of their own free will

Go gently
Go gently
Go gently

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Something To Look At:

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954)

Frida Karlo

I paint my own reality. The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to, and I paint whatever passes through my head without any other consideration. 
Frida Kahlo 

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Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/f/frida_kahlo.html#oJBvyK8peZt0PyMX.99 

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Something To Read:

Philip Larkin

Philip Larkin

(1922-1986)

 

Everyone should be forcibly transplanted to another continent from their family at the age of three.” 
― Philip LarkinPhilip Larkin: Letters to Monica

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Best Society

When I was a child, I thought,
Casually, that solitude
Never needed to be sought.
Something everybody had,
Like nakedness, it lay at hand,
Not specially right or specially wrong,
A plentiful and obvious thing
Not at all hard to understand.


Then, after twenty, it became
At once more difficult to get
And more desired – though all the same
More undesirable; for what
You are alone has, to achieve
The rank of fact, to be expressed
In terms of others, or it’s just
A compensating make-believe.


Much better stay in company!
To love you must have someone else,
Giving requires a legatee,
Good neighbours need whole parishfuls
Of folk to do it on – in short,
Our virtues are all social; if,
Deprived of solitude, you chafe,
It’s clear you’re not the virtuous sort.


Viciously, then, I lock my door.
The gas-fire breathes. The wind outside
Ushers in evening rain. Once more
Uncontradicting solitude
Supports me on its giant palm;
And like a sea-anemone
Or simple snail, there cautiously
Unfolds, emerges, what I am.

 

http://www.poemhunter.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Larkin

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Philip Larkin Sunday Sessions (Extract)

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Something To Think About:

George Steiner

(1929-)

literary critic, essayist, philosopher, novelist, translator, and educator.

George Steiner

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Language can only deal meaningfully with a special, restricted segment of reality. The rest, and it is presumably the much larger part, is silence. 
Read more at

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/g/george_steiner.html#1vwq3rhl8CHhkpc1.99 

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The most important tribute any human being can pay to a poem or a piece of prose he or she really loves is to learn it by heart. Not by brain, by heart; the expression is vital.
Read more at

 http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/g/george_steiner.html#1vwq3rhl8CHhkpc1.99

http://www.superfluitiesredux.com/2011/05/17/quotes-george-steiner/

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CHRISTMAS PICTURE QUIZ: Who is Who?

The Answers. Mouse over the bottom of each picture

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Something For You:

InspiredJoy, rather than happiness, is the goal of life, for joy is the emotion which accompanies our fulfilling our natures as human beings. It is based on the experience of one’s identity as a being of worth and dignity. Rollo May

Something For the Weekend #1

1 Dec

Horizons

‘It is the function of creative men to perceive the relations between thoughts, or things, or forms of expression that may seem utterly different and to be able to combine them into some new form’, William Plomer

Some inspirational snippets and recommendations for your weekend

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Something to Watch:

Once

Set in Dublin a story the lives of two ‘kindred spirits’ (one musician) the other a young mother (also with a love of music) intertwine.

 

Why: Brilliant score, beautiful scenery and warmth.

 

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Something To Look At:

Philosopher In Meditation by Rembrandt, 1832

Rembrandt, Philosopher in Meditation

From: http://www.rembrandtpainting.net/index.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosopher_in_Meditation

In common with Michelangelo and Rembrandt I am more interested in the line, its rise and fall, than in color.
Edvard Munch

 

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Something To Read:

An Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) Poem:

A Light Exists In Spring

A Light exists in Spring
Not present on the Year
At any other period —
When March is scarcely here

A Color stands abroad
On Solitary Fields
That Science cannot overtake
But Human Nature feels.

It waits upon the Lawn,
It shows the furthest Tree
Upon the furthest Slope you know
It almost speaks to you.

Then as Horizons step
Or Noons report away
Without the Formula of sound
It passes and we stay —

A quality of loss
Affecting our Content
As Trade had suddenly encroached
Upon a Sacrament.

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/a-light-exists-in-spring/

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Something To Think About:

‘If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel’s heartbeat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence’.

George Eliot, Middlemarch (1872)

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  • And check out Classic Friday with Nisha Moodley on author Elizabeth Gaskell here

Inspiration Point: Some Books About Creativity

21 Jul

This  post on  Tumblr.com  is worth checking out…a real range of very interesting books which  maybe worth adding to your bookshelves:

http://bookpickings.tumblr.com/tagged/creativity

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